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2015 André Aisenstadt Recipient

CRM > Prizes > André Aisenstadt Prize > Recipient > Louis-Pierre Arguin from the Université de Montréal and the City University of New York (Baruch College and Graduate Center)

2015 André Aisenstadt Prize in Mathematics Recipient
Louis-Pierre Arguin, Université de Montréal and the City University of New York (Baruch College and Graduate Center)

[ français ]

January 15, 2016 conference details

The International Scientific Advisory Committee of the Centre de recherches mathématiques (CRM) is happy to announce that Louis-Pierre Arguin from the Université de Montréal and the City University of New York (Baruch College and Graduate Center) is the 2015 André Aisenstadt Prize recipient.

Dr. Arguin obtained his M.Sc. degree in physics at the Université de Montréal in 2002 under the supervision of Yvan Saint-Aubin and his Ph.D. in mathematics at Princeton University in 2007 under the superivison of Michael Aizenman. Arguin's research interests lie in probability theory and its applications to mathematical physics and other fields. One of his most spectacular breakthroughs came in a series of joint papers with Anton Bovier and Nicola Kistler on the extreme values of branching Brownian motion. This work has received considerable international recognition and was the subject of a Séminaire Bourbaki in March 2013. The impact of the methods developed by Arguin and his collaborators goes beyond probability theory. In particular, Arguin, Belius and Harper have applied this approach to probe the conjecture of Fyodorov, Hiary and Keating stating that the maxima of the Riemann zeta function on a bounded interval of the critical line have statistics similar to branching Brownian motion.

In an earlier work with Aizenman, Arguin developed a new approach to a long-standing open problem in statistical mechanics now referred to as the Parisi Ultrametricity Conjecture. The conjecture is about a large class of interacting particle systems, called spin glasses. The ideas of Aizenman and Arguin were central to the construction of a rigorous theory of spin glasses, notably in the work of Panchenko, who proved the Ultrametricity Conjecture in the most general case in 2012.